Château Ducru Beaucaillou 2011 - A.O.C Saint-Julien
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95.00 On request
93.0 sur 100 based on 7 Average rating of the Experts

Experts Reviews

92+/100
Score dans le Guide Parker
Robert Parker
17.5/20
Score de Gault & Millau
Gault et Millau
17.5/20
Score de la RVF
RVF
94/100
Score de Wine Spectator
Wine Spectator
18.5/20
Score de Bettane & Besseauve
Bettane et Desseauve
17/20
Score du Figaro
Le Figaro Vin
93/
Score de The Wine Insider
Jeff Leve

The 2011 Ducru Beaucaillou (which normally represents 1/3 to ½ of the entire crop) possesses a dense ruby/purple color along with a beautiful nose of sweet creme de cassis, crushed rock and spring flower aromas. This rich, medium to full-bodied St.-Julien is among the most concentrated wines of the Medoc. Moderate tannin is sweet and well-integrated. This beauty will benefit from 3-5 years of cellaring and keep for two decades.
92+
points on 100
This is rather well-endowed for the vintage, with thickly layered ganache, currant paste, fig sauce and blackberry confiture notes still grappling with one another, while briary grip and dark spice fill out the toast-fueled finish. Very long, showing a level of power that belies the vintage. Best from 2018 through 2028.
94
points on 100
On peut parler de chair du fruit sur ce magnifique 2011. Une chair pulpeuse, riche, tendre, aux saveurs épicées et florales à la fois. Un vin de plaisir, un nectar succulent, d’une grande élégance de trame, très fine et subtile.
17.5
points on 20
Un joli vin élégant, moelleux, souple, charmant, tannins fins, beaucoup d'élégance.
17
points on 20
Un peu strict et austère mais avec un très noble retour du tannin en fin de bouche. Il se déguste plus équilibré que l'an dernier.
18.5
points on 20
With an earthy, herbal, olive and blackberry nose, this forward styled, open wine is light, fresh, clean and silky. Dominated by sweet, ripe black cherries in the end note, this will be drinkable on release and will get better with age. This is a very sold performance in a difficult vintage.
93
points on 100

Description

The history of Château Ducru-Beaucaillou is closely linked to that of the five families who have owned it and who have lived permanently since its construction in 1720. Ranked second in 1855 among the only 61 great red wines of Bordeaux retained in the famous prize list, it is the property of the Borie family for more than 60 years. Today, while many large Bordeaux chateaux are owned by far-flung conglomerates or often absent owners, the Borie family lives in the field on a daily basis and continues, with the loyal and passionate team that surrounds them, to mark their footprint this reputed area.




Turned towards the Gironde estuary

Château Ducru-Beaucaillou, whose origins date back to the beginning of the 18th century, owes its name to the 'beautiful pebbles' that characterize its terroir and whose exceptional wine-making advantages are reflected in the finesse and elegance of the wines it offers. produce. Is the title of this terroir that Ducru-Beaucaillou is often considered the quintessence, the very archetype of the appellation contrôlée Saint-Julien. This is one of the 14 second ranked crus in the 1855 ranking which includes 62 of the 75 most beautiful wines of Bordeaux and one of the few to belong to the category of "super seconds". Château Ducru-Beaucaillou and the vineyards that surround it are perched on a magnificent Médoc site with breathtaking views of the Gironde estuary, which, with a width of 6 km here, acts as a powerful climate moderator. It is one of the only castles in the Bordeaux region that is built directly on the cellars and one of the few to be permanently occupied by its owners. For more than sixty years, Ducru-Beaucaillou has belonged to the Borie family, today incorporated into a public limited company of Monique Borie, her daughter Sabine Coiffe and her son Bruno-Eugène who runs it.



On a gravel rump of Günz 

The benefits of pebbles are many, including:     

  • promote soil drainage
  • reflect the sun on clusters in these tightly planted vineyards
  • store the daytime heat to retrocede it at night
  • form a protective mat that limits the desiccation of soils during hot summers etc.

Assemblage

The vision of assembly at Ducru-Beaucaillou encompasses two objectives of equal importance: quality and uniformity.


L’élevage

L’élevage which lasts about 18-20 months, is carried out in keeping with the Médoc tradition of the Grands Crus classé with a racking every 3 months and a collage with egg white or albumen which comes before the last racking.



Technical sheet

  • The producer
    Château Ducru-Beaucaillou
  • Type of wine
    Second Classified Growth
  • Appellation
    Saint-Julien
  • Superficy
    75 hectares
  • Age of the vines
    35 years
  • Harvests
    100% hand harvested
  • Barrels
    60% of new barrels
  • When should you drink it?
    Drink between 2018 and 2033
  • Wine apogee
    2025
  • How is it now?
    Déguster maintenant ou conserver en cave
  • Service temperature
    16.5-18°

The vineyard

This Red wine (Classified Growth) from Saint-Julien is made with a vineyard that has an area of 75 hectares by Château Ducru-Beaucaillou. The average age of the vines is 35 years. The harvest for this wine are 100% hand harvested.

Into the cellars

This wine has remained 18 months in Oak barrels. For this wine, the estate has made the choice to incorporate 60% of new barrels.

Saint-Julien

The A.O.C Saint-Julien (968 hectares) was formalized in 1936. Located between Pauillac and Margaux both geographically and in style, it is one of the smallest Medoc appellation but the most consistent in quality. 18 active producers including 11 Classified Growths.
The appellation extends over 4.8 kilometers long by 3.2 kilometers wide and offers wines whose tannins have an incomparable finesse. What characterizes Saint-Julien is the terroir and the micro-climate. The terroir is a subtle blend between the contributions of stony alluvium from the Garonne and those from the Dordogne. The contributions therefore from the Pyrenees and the Massif Central. You should know that this agglomeration of rocks slowly broken then spread over the millennia is an exceptional case.